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Curious About Brand & Design

Wato Undo the Bridge

(Est. 2019) “Wato, available in Sweden, was created with the purpose of filling a vacuum in the market within functional drink. The first sugar-free and carbonated liquid substitute with or without caffeine, with the aim of being able to offer a more tasty and delicious alternative ‘on the go’ than traditional energy drink alternatives.” (Google-translated)

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The new American religion of UFOs

Belief in aliens is like faith in religion — and may come to replace it.

It’s a great time to believe in aliens.

Last week, the New York Times published a viral article about reports of UFOs off the East Coast in 2014 and 2015. It included an interview with five Navy pilots who witnessed, and in some cases recorded, mysterious flying objects with “no visible engine or infrared exhaust plumes” that appeared to “reach 30,000 feet and hypersonic speeds.”

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An oral history of the hamburger icon (from the people who were there)

When UX and product designer Geoff Alday got curious about who was responsible for the hamburger menu a few years ago, he did a little digging. He unearthed a video on Vimeo from a 1990 conference that demo-ed the history of widgets. In a segment about menus, the narrator describes how, on the title bars of windows in the Xerox Star, you find menu buttons, three little lines stacked in a square.

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What It’s Like to Have an ADHD Brain

’ve always sought comfort in familiar things. I rewatch the same TV shows. I reread the same books. I listen to the same songs for months on end. My routine isn’t about scheduling — it’s about having a shortlist of familiar activities. It feels as if I’m trying to escape my own spinning brain.

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How the Apple Store Lost Its Luster

Web Smith’s recent experience at his local Apple store in the suburbs of Columbus, Ohio, has been an exercise in frustration.

There was the time he visited the Easton Town Center location to buy a laptop for his 11-year-old daughter and spent almost 20 minutes getting an employee to accept his credit card. In January, Smith was buying a monitor and kept asking store workers to check him out, but they couldn’t because they were Apple “Geniuses” handling tech support and not sales.

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